Microsoft released Windows 10 May 2020 Update, version 2004, to the public last week. The latest feature update will be delivered in multiple stages, but is available through manual installation for anyone who’s interested. While the Windows maker has advised only to update when you see the notification through the Windows Update, if you are interested anyway and can deal with the known issues, here is the list of supported chips.

Microsoft made some minor changes to these specs, adding the latest chips in the mix. “The processors listed in the tables below, represent the latest processor generations and models which are supported for the listed Windows Edition,” the company wrote. “Previous generations of processors and models (indicated by “Up through”), remain supported in addition to the listed processors and models.”

Microsoft Details Features That Are Being Dropped or Deprecated With Windows 10 May 2020 Update – List

We have already shared the complete list of requirements in this earlier piece, here are the latest Windows 10 CPU requirements that add new generations of chips in the supported list.

Devices that run Windows 10 for desktop editions require a 1 GHz or faster processor or SoC that meets the following requirements:

  • Compatible with the x86* or x64 instruction set.
  • Supports PAE, NX and SSE2.
  • Supports CMPXCHG16b, LAHF/SAHF, and PrefetchW for 64-bit OS installation

For Intel, the newly updated document now mentions the following supported chips:

Up through the following 10th Generation Intel Processors (Intel Core i3/i5/i7/i9-10xxx), and Intel Xeon W-12xx/W-108xx[1], Intel Xeon SP 32xx, 42xx, 52xx, 62xx, and 82xx[1], Intel Atom (J4xxx/J5xxx and N4xxx/N5xxx), Celeron and Pentium Processors

For AMD, Windows 10 version 2004 supports:

Up through the following AMD 7th Generation Processors (A-Series Ax-9xxx & E-Series Ex-9xxx & FX-9xxx); AMD Athlon 2xx processors, AMD Ryzen 3/5/7 4xxx, AMD Opteron[2] and AMD EPYC 7xxx[2]

Finally, for Qualcomm:

Qualcomm Snapdragon 850 and 8cx

As reported earlier, Microsoft has also started its journey towards phasing out support for 32-bit, with Windows 10 version 2004 being the first update that will no longer ship the 32-bit build to OEMs. “Beginning with Windows 10, version 2004, all new Windows 10 systems will be required to use 64-bit builds and Microsoft will no longer release 32-bit builds for OEM distribution,” the Windows maker had said. These build will still be available for end users but OEMs would no longer receive it.

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